John Curtas is …

Wine

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The Scariest Thing in Las Vegas

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Boo!

Happy All Hallow’s Eve!

We at ELV hope you enjoy your horrors on this night of terrors.

Which got us to thinking (and no, it didn’t hurt): What is the scariest thing to most people?

Spiders?

Snakes?

Commitment?

Clowns under your bed? (see above)

We looked up “phobias” and the list was so long we instantaneously developed pinaciphobia – a fear of lists.

Then we got to thinking a little harder (and yes, it began to hurt, a little), and then we realized what scares us more than anything in Las Vegas: wine lists with lots of commas.

And then we realized, without thinking hard at all, what was the scariest thing in Las Vegas restaurants, and the answer was easy. Behold if you can, ladies and gentlemen, the most terrifying thing in Las Vegas, the wine list at Carnevino:

As you can see, it is not for the timid. It is huge: it is massive; it is intimidating; it can be hard to read, and it is also stocked with only a single bottle for under $100 — a mediocre, overpriced prosecco in the upper left hand corner for $85. The cheapest Italian white wine on the list is $150. (Ed. note: there isn’t an Italian white wine on earth worth $150/btl.)

The last thing it is for (as you’ll read below) is selling wine to the average, well-heeled restaurant consumer who has a healthy interest in drinking Italian wines.

It is a list so overpriced as to make a mockery of every other tourist-soaking, conventioneer-gouging, fuck-you wine list on the Strip.

It is a list so ridiculous it will make you run to Joël Robuchon, Guy Savoy, or Twist by Pierre Gagnaire for relief.

It is wine pricing so outrageous that it should embarrass co-owner Joe Bastianich, who, in the foreward to his 2010 book Grandi Vini – An Opinionated Tour of Italy’s 89 Finest Wines (2010)  wrote that wines on restaurant wine list should never be priced at “over 2 1/2 times over their wholesale cost.”

This is the same Joe B. who wrote in his book Restaurant Man (2012): “We’re in the business of of taking people’s money, but we’re not in the business of ripping people off.” He also claims in the same book that he sometimes “can’t sleep at night” thinking about the size of the checks in his restaurants.

To which I call horseshit.

So what is it Joe? Are you interested in people appreciating wine, or just bending over high rollers? Or are you and Mario Batali too busy being TV stars to care anymore?

Bastianich also says that the price of wine is “…more like art than cars — the subjectivity is what drives its price, but the quantitative costs quickly dissociate themselves from the price when the product reaches the consumer.”

To which I would ask him: What subjectivity makes a $60 bottle of Jermann Tunina (that cost you $30) worth $210 on your wine list? Is it really your appreciation of the “art” in the bottle that has you selling your entire wine list for 4-5xs the wholesale price of these wines?

Wine most definitely is not like clothing, or furniture, or cars. It is the only consumer product I know of where a certain type of retailer (restaurants) unblinkingly, unapologetically, charge double or triple the retail price of something you can buy much cheaper just down the street. Because, atmosphere.

To which I am finally forced to call bullshit.

But there is a reason for this rapacity, oh yes, there is.

As one general manager of another Strip restaurant told me, “Carnevino has a partnership with the Venetian, so all it (the wine list) is there for is to soak up comps.”

Another local wine purveyor of great repute calls the list a “rape job,” and that about gets it right.

None of this will endear me to the folks at Carnevino, but someone has to say it out loud, because enough is enough.

I love you Carnevino, I love your food, and I love your atmosphere, and I love what you’ve done for the Las Vegas food community and restaurant scene. And I used to love your wine list, like five years ago when it was merely expensive.

But I know a clip joint when I see one, and I will drink wine no more in your establishment.

Your list has given me a bad case of oenopinaciphobia (fear of wine lists), and the only cure I know for it is to do my Italian wine drinking in Italy. Or Ferraro’s.

I am divorcing the “vino” from Carnevino, until some sanity is restored. Until then, enjoy counting your money Mario and Joe, and stop slinging the bull about sleepless nights and your “love” of Italian wine.

>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<

ELV update: Last night at dinner we received this tweet from Mario Batali:

 Mario Batali Retweeted John Curtas

hey jc for tonite we have 29 wines under $80 16 wines under $60 2 wines under $50 and that’s just the start! thanks bud!

Mario Batali added,

BOTECO Bucks the Odds

When Standard & Poor closed, my (already low) opinion of Green Valley plunged even further. For years I’ve called GV the land of $400,000 homes and $40,000 cars where no one wants to spend more than forty bucks on dinner. Just weeks before S&P shuttered, this little jewel box opened in a giant strip mall that houses at least two dozen other food options. Boteco is so small and so obscure — wedged between something called the “Beach Hut Deli” and a pet food store — that you can be parked right in front of it and miss it. But miss it you should not do, not if you want to taste Spanish-styled, chef-driven, Robuchon-inspired food the likes of which this backwater probably can’t appreciate.

But appreciate it you should. Because if you’re reading these words, you are obviously a person in search of good taste, and tastes don’t get much better than what chef Rachel LaGloahec is putting on these plate. This is not complicated food, a la Sparrow + Wolf, nor is it the “too hip for the room” cooking that failed down the street. These are the musings of a confident young chef, who has obviously been well-trained, and who hits her marks with every beat.

Take her weekend brunch for instance. Everyone knows I hate brunch. And I hate it because most brunch menus are about as inspiring as a Mitch McConnell press conference. LaGloahec got me interested from the first bite of her house-vodka-cured salmon:

…and spices things up further with Tacos da Moda — scrambled eggs with strips of steak and Spanish chorizo, ready to be rolled into some house-made corn tortillas — as beautiful a breakfast concoction as one can construct. Don’t miss the Dutch Baby-style pancakes, either —  served with a strawberry coulis and champagne zabaglione —  her trio of Botequito sliders dripping with melted onions and smoked Gouda on a brioche bun that’s a wonder unto itself. If that’s not enough to get you out of your brunch rut, the trio of prosecco “flights” — bellini, cassis, and limoncello — is a lip-smacking steal at $12.

At dinner, there are only twelve things on the menu, but those sliders, an avocado crunch salad and a Singapore Chilli Crab dip are a delight, and the kind of food that’s unknown this far from the Strip.  There’s even a poutine on the menu for the calorie-challenged, fabulous Spanish ham, good oysters, and escargot croquetas and braised beef with Piedmontese rice for ectomorphs in need of a good rib-sticking. This is a mix and match menu that’s made for fun. Boteco means “meeting place” for friends and family, and if you and yours are looking for a place to congregate, you won’t find any better in this neck of the culinary desert.

BOTECO

9500 S. Eastern Ave. #170

Las Vegas, NV 89123

702.790.2323

http://botecolv.com/

 

Roman (Wine) Holiday Part II

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If Cincinnato and Marco Carpineti represent Roman vinters moving forward by looking to the past, Casale Del Giglio is a winery of a much more modern stripe. Located on the slopes and plains (and some former marshland) some fifty kilometers south of Rome, it utilizes its 180 hectares of vines to make an assortment of varietals that stretch the boundaries of what Italian wines can be.

Along with wine journalist Charles Scicolone, we toured the winery with winemaker Paolo Tiefenthaler who explained that the area, being located on sandy soil in the Agro Potino valley near Anzio, did not have much of a wine-making tradition before they started cultivating it back in the 1990s. Teifenthaler told us through an interpreter that they saw this unexplored territory as being perfect for viticultural experimentation — it having a temperate maritime climate similar to those found in Australia, California and Bordeaux. As a result (and with the full blessing of the European Union), over sixty different varietals were planted to see what grew (and tasted) best. With such a broad canvas to work from, Tiefenthaler arrived at a stunning assortment of wines — fifteen in all — that aim to bridge the gap between classic and international tastes, as well as solidifying the area as a microclimate to be taken seriously.

One very un-Italian thing about Casale Del Giglio’s wines are the labels. In a nod towards the international market (and in breaking with the traditional Italian wine labels – the motto of which has always been: “obscurity and confusion over clarity and information”), their bottles identify the maker, the grape (if it’s not a blend) and the location of the vineyard. Most of their wines are classified as IGT (Indicazione Geografica Tipica – the third tier of Italian wine classification) which allots more freedom to winemakers to use different grapes and blends than the more restrictive DOCG and DOC denominations.

Triefenthaler takes that freedom and runs with it. His chardonnay uses no oak and goes through no malolactic (secondary) fermentation. The result is a full-bodied, crisp wine that is a pure expression of the grape. It was one of many non-traditional wines we tasted that caused me and Scicolone to sit up and take notice. Just as pleasantly surprising was the Albiola Rosato — a rose of Syrah and Sangiovese grapes — that was surprisingly rich for a wine so pink. It’s strong acidity and raspberry/strawberry aromas make it a perfect wine for sipping all Summer long.

 

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On the more traditional front, Casale Del Giglio weighs in with a big, spicy, tannic, vaguely herbaceous Cesanese (pictured above) that Elise Rialland — our winery guide for the day — said goes perfectly with a Spezzatino di Bufaletta dell’Agro Pontino (water buffalo stew). Absent any water buffalo in your neighborhood, a beef stew would match splendidly as well.

Of the other red wines we tasted, the huge, sweetly tannic Tempranijo was a monster that needs taming by food or aging, and the 100% Cabernet Sauvignon showed promise as well, although, like many of the reds, it seemed quite young, very fruit-forward and a bit rough around the edges. Still, when you consider that these wines retail for well under twenty dollars a bottle, you’re getting quite a mouthful for the price.

Two wines that need no qualifiers are the Bellone and Mater Matuta. The Bellone is yet another worthwhile way to break the bonds of your chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, or pinot grigio habit — it being a complex and subtle blend of ripe tropical fruit beneath a nicely floral nose. What sets it apart from your run-of-the-mill $15 white wines is the strong acidity and a bracing finish that tastes like a sea breeze smells. I can’t think of a better wine to accompany a fish stew or raw seafood platter.

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If the Bellone is an ode to the ancient varietals of Lazio (the province of Italy wherein Rome lies), the Mater Matuta represents a leap into the 21st Century. Elegant and powerful, this flagship wine is a blend of 85% Syrah and 15% Petit Verdot, and displays a deep, dense ruby red color, and complex aromas of black cherry, coffee and about half a spice rack. The tannins are finely integrated and the finish lasts until next Tuesday. In all, quite a bottle for $50, and quite a landmark for an area that had no idea it could make such a splash with grapes that had never before spoken Italian.

Old school or new, Roman wines have broken the shackles of cheap white wine that defined its viticulture for so long. Tasting the full panoply of Casale Del Giglio wines (including a wonderful late harvest wine called Aphrodisium) taught me that no longer will I look past the “Lazio” designation when I see it in a wine store or on a list. These are very attractive wines at very attractive prices, and all of them are made to match with Roman food, one of the world’s great cuisines.

A FEW WORDS ABOUT ROMAN RESTAURANTS

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“To a Roman, wine is just another form of food.” Charles Scicolone reminded me of this several times as we tasted our way around Rome for a week. What he also impressed upon me was that Romans (who are very serious about their cuisine) look upon wine as an integral part of any meal, but, being Romans, don’t exactly stress out over it. You’ll never find a Roman dissecting the fine points of a food and wine match. Certain fundamental rules are followed (lighter wines with fish, heavier ones with meat), but after that it is all about enjoying them simultaneously. Here are a few restaurant and wine bars where you can maximize your enjoyment of both in the Eternal City.

Il Sanlorenzo –  Despite being 45 minutes from the ocean, Rome has never been much of a seafood town, until now. This elegant, seafood-centric place, a block off of the Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, proudly displays the daily catch at the front bar, offers six kinds of Le Acque (mineral water), artisanal breads, and stunning selection of raw seafood. It’s 85€ tasting menu is quite the bargain, and the modernist carpaccio of red shrimps just as satisfying as the artful twist on linguine con vongole.

Flavio al Velavevodetto  – The trouble with traveling to Rome (as with New York, Paris, Tokyo, etc.) is I’m always torn between classic places to which I can’t wait to return, and wanting to try out newer joints that everyone is raving about. Thankfully, Rome doesn’t follow food trends as much as the rest of the world, so it’s easier to ignore whatever some travel magazine is writing about this month. Flavio de Velavevodetto has been around forever, and isn’t on anyone’s thrillist, but the food is Roman to the core. A wall of wines greets you as you enter (and doubles as the wine list) and the menu couldn’t be simpler. The rigatoni con la pajata (with veal intestines) and coda alla vaccianara (braised oxtail) also could not be any better. “Velavevodetto” means something like a Roman “I told you so,” and after two bites of your meal, you will have to admit that I told you so.

Checchino dal 1887 – Right around the corner from Flavio al Velavevodetto is this venerable establishment, that is just as comfortable and just as good. Specializing in the “fifth quarter” of the animal, the menu is a testament to how Romans were into offal long before it became fashionable. Wonderful wine list as well.

Dal Bolognese –  I never go to Rome without taking at least one meal here. Directly off the Piazza del Popolo, you enter this fashionable haunt of power lunchers and well-healed shoppers. The thing to get is the bollito misto with mostarda and salsa verde. There might be other good things to eat on the menu, but the meat platter with mustard fruits is so spectacular I can’t even think of ordering anything else. Except the fritto misto (fried seafood); it’s out-of-this-world too.

Al Moro – There is an old saying about Roman restaurants that the worse the art is on the walls, the better the food. Al Moro’s walls won’t win any awards (see picture above), but the fegato (calves liver with agrodolce onions) ought to be enshrined somewhere. You won’t find better culatello ham or bufala mozzerella anywhere else around the Trevi Fountain, either. Go early for lunch to see how the smart business set enjoys its midday repast.

A FEW MORE WORDS ABOUT ROMAN WINE BARS

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Roman ristorante are far less formal affairs than their Parisian counterparts. Still, you’re expected to order two or three courses in them, and they are not the place to pick up a light bite. For that you have pizzerias and espresso bars everywhere (of variable quality), but for our money, wine bars are the way to go if you want a simple snack or plate of pasta without a lot of fuss after dark. The bonus is, of course, they also have incredible wine selections, some real bargains by the glass (or carafe), and no one frowns at you if you just want a small plate of some incredible artichoke ravioli with a Gravner Breg like we had L’Angolo Divino. The other bonus is these spots are all within a short walk of each other in the Centro Storico

Il Goccetto (pictured above) – Very popular with the young crowd. Doubles as a wine store. Nice antipasti display counter as you enter. Go early or late and go with a thirst.

Cul de Sac – An old favorite off the Piazza Navona. Friendly welcome. Outdoor seating.  Rome’s first proper wine bar (since 1977) is still one one the best, with food a lot better than you expect it to be.

L’Angolo Divino – A cozy spot right off the Camp de’ Fiori, the modest entrance gives you not a clue as to the beauty of the food and the wine selection. An incredible list with a very helpful staff.

THE WINERY

CASALE DEL GIGLIO

Le Ferriere

Latina LY, Italy

39 06 9290 2530

http://www.casaledelgiglio.it/en/

THE RESTAURANTS

AL MORO

13, Vicolo Bollette

39 06 678 3495

http://www.ristorantealmororoma.com/en

CHECCHINO DAL 1887

30, Via di Monte Testaccio

39 06 574 3816

https://www.checchino-dal-1887.com/

DAL BOLOGNESE

1, Piazza del Popolo

39 06 361 1426

FLAVIO AL VELAVEVODETTO

97, Via di Monte Testaccio

39 06 574 4194

http://www.ristorantevelavevodetto.it/

IL SANLORENZO

4/5, Via dei Chiavari

39 06 68 65 097

http://www.ilsanlorenzo.it/

THE WINE BARS

CUL DE SAC

73, Piazza di Pasquino

39 06 6880 1094

ENOTECA IL GOCCETTO

14, Via dei Banchi Vecchi

39 06 686 4268

L’ANGLO DIVINO

Via del Balestrari

06 68 64 413

http://www.angolodivino.it/it/homepage

 

 

 

 

 

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